Last edited by Mishura
Saturday, October 17, 2020 | History

7 edition of Who Owns Culture? found in the catalog.

Who Owns Culture?

Appropriation And Authenticity In American Law (Rutgers Series on the Public Life of the Arts)

by Susan Scafidi

  • 389 Want to read
  • 21 Currently reading

Published by Rutgers University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Cultural studies,
  • Intellectual property, copyright & patents,
  • Legal Reference / Law Profession,
  • Intellectual Property - General,
  • Law,
  • USA,
  • Material culture,
  • Administrative Law & Regulatory Practice,
  • Folklore,
  • Culture and law,
  • Intellectual property,
  • United States

  • The Physical Object
    FormatPaperback
    Number of Pages203
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8026130M
    ISBN 100813536065
    ISBN 109780813536064

    The Crisis in the Arts book. Read 5 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Conservatives tend to see our popular culture as a toxic wast /5. "A condemnation of cultural property laws that restrict the international trade in antiquities, the book doubles as a celebration of the world's great border-crossing encyclopedic museums."—Jori Finkel, New York Times "Who Owns Antiquity? is an impassioned argument for what Cuno calls the 'cosmopolitan aspirations' of encyclopedic museums. By.

      A look back at the ancient history of stolen recipes, culinary appropriation and the colonization of foodscapes lends some historical perspective to the debate over who truly owns a recipe.   Who Owns Native Culture? by Michael F. Brown, , available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide/5(81).

    Slate is an online magazine that covers current affairs, politics, and culture in the United States. It is known, and sometimes criticized, for adopting contrarian views, giving rise to the term "Slate Pitches". It has a generally liberal editorial stance.. It was created in by former New Republic editor Michael Kinsley, initially under the ownership of Microsoft as part of d by: Michael Kinsley. Derrick Jensen takes no prisoners in The Culture of Make Believe, his brilliant and eagerly awaited follow-up to his powerful and lyrical A Language Older Than begins as an exploration of the lines of thought and experience that run between the massive lynchings in early twentieth-century America to today's death squads in South America soon explodes into an/5.


Share this book
You might also like
Irrigation design in Africa

Irrigation design in Africa

social wasps

social wasps

Pennsylvania War-Office, May 2d, 1777. To the public.

Pennsylvania War-Office, May 2d, 1777. To the public.

Michigan Big Game Records

Michigan Big Game Records

Changing the Course of Marketing

Changing the Course of Marketing

New poets of England and America

New poets of England and America

Jesus

Jesus

A Pocketful of Stars

A Pocketful of Stars

Analysis of the new metals

Analysis of the new metals

Record changers

Record changers

Sae Transactions

Sae Transactions

Changing name of steamer Naomi to E. G. Crosby.

Changing name of steamer Naomi to E. G. Crosby.

Lovers Gold

Lovers Gold

The ninth parliament election

The ninth parliament election

Volunteer service for peace

Volunteer service for peace

act for the better regulation of watermen, barge owners, and others connected with the navigation of the river Thames

act for the better regulation of watermen, barge owners, and others connected with the navigation of the river Thames

Who Owns Culture? by Susan Scafidi Download PDF EPUB FB2

Who Owns Culture?: Appropriation and Authenticity in American Law (RUTGERS SERIES ON THE PUBLIC LIFE OF THE ARTS) Paperback – June 8, #N#Susan Scafidi (Author) › Visit Amazon's Susan Scafidi Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. See search results for this author. Who Owns Culture? book you an author. Learn about Author Central/5(6). “For the uninitiated, Michael Brown's thoughtful book, Who Owns Native Culture?, can serve as a welcome point of entry into current debates on cultural property.

Written for a general audience in an engaging style, the book offers a virtual fieldtrip in which readers are introduced to the issues through consideration of recent court cases Cited by: Who Owns Culture.

offers the first comprehensive analysis of cultural authorship and appropriation within American law. From indigenous art to Linux, Susan Scafidi takes the reader on a tour of the no-man's-land between law and culture, pausing to ask: What prompts us to offer legal protection to works of literature, but not folklore.

"Cultural appropriation" is a hot topic these days, a great example of how frustrating debate in the 21st century can be. An emotionally-charged subject with unclear boundaries and varying definitions that has deep implications for capital-letter topics like Authenticity, Identity, Ownership, and Power is an ideal engine for producing negative-sum arguments that leave everyone more angry and /5.

Who Owns Who Owns Culture? book. Book Description: It is not uncommon for white suburban youths to perform rap music, for New York fashion designers to ransack the world's closets for inspiration, or for Euro-American authors to adopt the voice of a geisha or shaman.

For the uninitiated, Michael Brown's thoughtful book, Who Owns Native Culture?, can serve as a welcome point of entry into current debates on cultural property. Written for a general audience in an engaging style, the book offers a virtual fieldtrip in which readers are introduced to the issues through consideration of recent court cases /5(5).

The “brilliant” and “daringly original” (The New York Times) critique of digital networks from the “David Foster Wallace of tech” (London Evening Standard)—asserting that to fix our economy, we must fix our information Lanier is the father of virtual reality Cited by: Who Owns Native Culture book.

Read 7 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. The practical and artistic creations of native peoples perme /5. Who Owns Culture. offers the first comprehensive analysis of cultural authorship and appropriation within American law.

From indigenous art to Linux, Susan Scafidi takes the reader on a tour of the no-man's-land between law and culture, pausing to ask: What prompts us to offer legal protection to works of literature, but not folklore?Reviews: 1.

It's titled Who Owns Culture. You'll be most interested in Track 4, the actual discussion between Lawrence Lessig and Jeff Tweedy, moderated by Steve Johnson.

The discussion took place in the New York Public Library on April 7th,   Who Owns Culture. offers the first comprehensive analysis of cultural authorship and appropriation within American law. From indigenous art to Linux, Susan Scafidi takes the reader on a tour of the no-man's-land between law and culture, pausing to ask: What prompts us to offer legal protection to works of literature, but not folklore?Author: Susan Scafidi.

The brilliant and daringly original (The New York Times) critique of digital networks from the David Foster Wallace of tech (London Evening Standard)asserting that to fix our economy, we must fix our information Lanier is the father of virtual reality and one of the worlds most brilliant thinkers.

Who Owns the Future. is his visionary reckoning with the most/5(). Pdf of first 31 pages of book, including front matter, preface, introduction, and part of Chapter One.

"Who Owns Culture?" J Radio interview broadcast on BBC/Radio 4 program Analysis. Also includes interview material from Adam Kuper and others. Who Owns Native Culture. documents the efforts of indigenous peoples to redefine heritage as a proprietary resource.

By focusing on the complexity of actual cases, Michael Brown casts light on indigenous claims in diverse fields -- religion, art, sacred places, and botanical knowledge. He proposes alternative strategies for defending the heritage of vulnerable native communities without. An Amazon Best Book of the Month, May Jaron Lanier's last book, You Are Not a Gadget, was an influential criticism of Web 's crowd-sourced Who Owns the Future?, Lanier is interested in how network technologies affect our culture, economy, and collective is talking about pretty heady stuff--the monopolistic power of big tech companies (dubbed "Siren Servers /5().

Facebook, Inc. is a social networking company that has acquired 82 other companies, including WhatsApp acquisition closed at a steep $16 billion; more than $40 per user of the platform. Facebook also purchased the defunct company ConnectU in a court settlement and acquired intellectual property formerly held by rival majority of the companies acquired by.

In his book Who Owns Antiquity?, James Cuno argued that antiquities are the cultural property of humankind, not of the countries that lay exclusive claim to them.

Now in Whose Culture?, Cuno assembles preeminent museum directors, curators, and scholars to explain for themselves what’s at stake in this struggle — and why the museums. A compelling study uncovers the secrets of English land ownership and argues that reform is long overdue.

Farmland at Keld in Swaledale, about. In the summer ofChris bought out Cliff and renamed the store Book Culture. In the fall ofBook Culture opened a second shop on Broadway at th Street, a corner which has Author: Literary Hub.

Ready Player One is a science fiction novel, and the debut novel of American author Ernest story, set in a dystopia infollows protagonist Wade Watts on his search for an Easter egg in a worldwide virtual reality game, the discovery of which would lead him to inherit the game creator's fortune.

Cline sold the rights to publish the novel in Junein a bidding war to Author: Ernest Cline. We’re Equinor, a broad energy company with a proud history.

We committed colleagues developing oil, gas, wind and solar energy in more than 30 countries worldwide. We’re the largest operator in Norway, one of the world’s largest offshore operators, and a growing force in renewables.

Driven by our dedication to safety, equality. Who Owns Native Culture? By Michael. F. Brown. Cambridge: Harvard University Press. Pp:xii+ Price: US $ The main subject of Who Owns Native Culture? is the complex and ambiguous relationship between native peoples and the nation-states in .Book review Michael F.

Brown. Who Owns Native Culture? Harvard University Press, Cambridge () pp. Angela M. Haas Illinois State University In Who Owns Native Culture? cultural anthropologist Michael F. Brown traces issues related to the ownership.